Saturday, April 12, 2014

Cedar Poles in the Garden


Last year I saw Monticello's Gardens featured in a couple different magazines and I was so inspired by the organic materials used as supports in the vegetable garden that I knew I wanted to incorporate a few of the same ideas in our own vegetable garden. In particular, the poles used to support climbing beans and peas.  

Founding Gardener
Image via Martha Stewart

I included a picture of the gardens there... isn't it amazing?  One day I'd love to visit in person.

I showed Justus the pictures I had gathered and expected him to laugh, but he was all for the idea and said there were so many fallen cedar trees at my parents' farm that it would be easy to gather some to use.  One afternoon we bundled up for a hike in the woods and gathered cedar poles.  The poles needed to have the limbs removed first as you can see.


We used three poles per "trellis" and buried the base of the poles in the ground.


The tops of the poles are tied together with some jute rope. 


Yesterday the girls and I finally got the spring garden planted: lettuce, kale, broccoli and peas.  The poles will hopefully be a support for the climbing peas.

P.S.  You can see a glimpse of our new garden fence pictured.  I can't wait to show the entire thing to you, particularly since that will mean I've finished painting!  With nearly 300 pickets, it's taking me awhile.  (smile)

Have a wonderful weekend! 


14 comments:

  1. Great idea! I saved some of the long straight shoots we pruned from the apple trees for lighter weight supports.

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  2. It will look amazing too, especially once the plants begin to climb! Thanks for sharing your inspiring gardening ideas!

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  3. Oh Andrea, your garden will look amazing with those poles! We are doing a similar idea with bamboo. And your fence is so charming...nothing like a white picket fence. Can't wait to see more pictures of it.

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  4. OH- I love those sort of supports. Your garden is going to look beautiful. That is a whole lotta pickets to paint, girlie! xoDiana

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  5. I started reading your blog last summer when you posted those gorgeous pictures of your garden. I can't wait to see THIS year's garden--it's going to be spectacular! (No pressure, ha!) Years ago I visited Mt. Vernon and those gardens were beautiful, but I never thought to look up Monticello's gardens. I will have to google those tonight.

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, you are an extremely talented photographer. Your photos always look like they should be featured in a Martha Stewart magazine. Thanks for sharing your many talents!

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    1. Thank you so much for the extremely sweet compliment, Mimi! I still feel like I have so much to learn about photography, but I love it. :-)

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  6. I would love to make a trellis like this for morning glories. If I do it fairly soon the ground will still be soft enough for me to bury the poles! Your fence is perfect. I have to paint my front porch railing this year and am dreading it. Are you using a brush or a roller? Probably both!

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    1. Hi Ann! Unfortunately the wood is too rough to use a roller. We've sprayed some of it, but most of it has been done with a brush.

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  7. Andrea,

    Love your garden!!!! Just before I read your post I had been googling Monticello. I am completely infatuated and really want to visit it some day. There is a book about the gardens at Monticello called "A Rich Spot of Earth". It's written by Peter J. Hatch who has been the Director of Gardens and Grounds at Monticello since 1977. He has restored the gardens to be what they were when Thomas Jefferson lived there. I have had this book for a year or so, but we moved a few months ago, so decided it would be a good read this spring/summer.

    Another fun thing I just discovered. When you look at Monticello on Google Maps there is a small square in the left had corner. All trails, road, walkways that are highlighted in blue are ones you can click on and see. It is like being there. I just kept clicking down the path "walking" right by the entire garden!!! :) It's a great substitute until one can get there in person. I was doing this very thing before I clicked over and read your post. :)

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    1. Thanks so much for the info! I'm looking forward to looking up the book and map. :-)

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  8. How fun! I've always like the look of those types of trellis for veggies. You just can't get more simple. You've inspired me to give it a try. My little one was asking if we were growing snap peas again this year and I think they would work wonderful growing up a pole like that.

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  9. Great Job Andrea. I do the same thing but a much smaller scale, the three poles for my tomatoes. It works very nicely. I actually put a clay pot on the top instead of tying it and it also works. Just an idea.
    Hope your garden turns out lovely and by the way don't look at anything Martha does. It is impossible and she has staff of tons of people who do everything for her around the clock. Anyone would have a perfect garden if a staff was involved. Yours will be more beautiful.

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  10. I have lived in Richmond for three years and took the hour long drive to Monticello a year ago and fell in love with the gardens. You and your husband did a wonderful job in your own garden with your poles for your vegetables. I cant wait too see how they look throughout the summer months.
    I hope you and your family have a chance to visit Monticello and the surrounding areas someday and I am sure you would love it!!!

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